The Diploma They Don’t Deserve

The Diploma They Don't Deserve

Maya Musse, Staff Writer

As you go through the years of high school, you learn to observe all the different types of characters that fill a classroom. There are the AP and honors students, the athletes, the students who are typically quiet but do their part, and finally, there are the idlers. The Oxford Dictionary defines an idler as “a person who passes time in a lazy or unproductive way”. These are the kids who are useless in every possible way, only filling space in a room. Students like that still graduate with people who actually contribute their efforts to the school, unironically. 

We can all do a mental puzzle to decide where everyone fits socially and academically. For a student who is barely in class or does their work, they still have the ability to move onto the next grade. They cheat their way through by asking a nice enough student to do the work for them. I witness this from time to time, but what can I actually do? There’s a social conflict where I can say something but be targeted by a bully, or I can stay quiet while someone who is undeserving of a grade, passes. Granted, the student who gives them the work is at fault as well but did the idler really deserve to move on even when teachers know they’ve done nothing? In the New York Times article “Why the New Education Law is Good for Children Left Behind” reads, “No Child Left Behind was supposed to close achievement gaps for disadvantaged students…Instead, things have gotten worse by almost every measure. SAT scores have declined, as have the scores of American students, compared with their counterparts in other nations, on the PISA exam.” Students knowing they can still graduate high school even if they put in the bare minimum causes them to slack off and become unwilling to do the work. 

Looking at junior and senior year- two really important grades, we see some students on their work grind, while others are sitting back, looking at these last two years as a final chapter. With that in mind, they become disrespectful, insubordinate floaters around the school. They become careless and lazy as the year progresses, getting answers off of anyone who’s willing to give it to them. The administration should pick up on the laziness demonstrated by these students and execute an act of discipline. Instead of trying to get on their good side, they need to help shape them into decent humans. The administration is the student body’s form of proper guidance. If their job is to keep up a well-functioned school, they should really look into fixing the way students behave. 

Still left in the unknown, most of the graduating class of the present year will be moving on from high school. An undeserved piece of paper is handed to the insubordinate for showing up to the building. Congratulations. An example to make it more clear: If it were between a plumber and a doctor to do surgery on you, you wouldn’t choose the plumber just to help him move up in life. Relating that example back to students, the doctor would be the students who try, and the plumber would be the students who have less qualifications. What upsets me most is that I will be graduating with the same people who cheated their way through and did the bare minimum. Although I should be more focused on my own high school experience, I do believe that some of my peers shouldn’t have the ability to move through school so easily.  It’s proven every day, through observation of being a full-time student, that there are certain people who do not deserve a diploma. If those types of kids aren’t “fit” for school, then they should be removed from the system. It’s a waste of the teacher’s and their surrounding peers’ time. 

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2015/12/10/opinion/why-the-new-education-law-is-good-for-children-left-behind.html