Frozen 2: More Earworm-y Songs, but in the Best Possible Way

The gang is back! Queen Elsa steals the spotlight in this impressive sequel.

Francesca Fierro

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Frozen 2 has descended upon us, and it does not disappoint. Packed with action, beautiful animation, and a gorgeous soundtrack, this blockbuster will leave you breathless (and sniffling, as certain scenes speak to the more serious, darker tone of this sequel).

Queen Elsa is finally at rest, and its been three years since she opened the gates and welcomed her adoring younger sister, Anna back into her life. One of the opening scenes is an adorable boys-against-girls charades night with the whole gang: Olaf can “rearrange” and destroys the competition, much to Anna’s annoyance. When it’s Elsa’s turn, she abruptly turns to the window, searching, and hurriedly excuses herself.

Ever-attentive Anna visits her later and inquires what’s wrong, and Elsa confesses that she’s been hearing a mysterious siren’s voice calling to her. After her first knockout number “Into the Unknown”, where she battles with curiosity to follow the voice with fear that she will irrevocably ruin the idyllic existence she now has, Elsa accidentally awakens spirits who force the citizens of Arende

lle to evacuate the kingdom.

Thus begins the epic quest. Elsa, Anna, Sven, Kristoff, and the newly mature Olaf take off to the enchanted forest in search of answers- about the spirits, the origin of Elsa’s powers, and the complicated past of the Arendelle with the indigenous Northundra people. The plot quickly advances, with rapid point-of-view shifts and characters’ dramatic revelations about themselves, lov

e and growing up.

As for reluctant parents, fear not: while kids will find Olaf’s jokes are still as hilarious and Elsa’s dresses just as dazzling, the fear of things changing too quickly resonates with everyone. Anna struggles with the idea of Elsa no longer needing, or even necessarily wanting her constant accompaniment. Olaf asks Anna if she’s worried about “the notion that nothing is permanent.” Kristoff itches to pop the question to Anna, but his awkwardness seems to thwart every attempt. And Elsa learns how to finally embrace her icy powers, especially during her self-love anthem “Show Yourself”. And for any teenagers who are officially “too old for Disney”, don’t kid yourself. As soon as the first na na na heyana chorus fills the theater, you will feel like you never left.