The Clifton Hub

  • September 5or drop by N115 to speak to her

  • September 5Want to write for The Hub? Please send your work to Ms. Miller-Hamilton at [email protected]

The Mandela Effect

Back to Article
Back to Article

The Mandela Effect

Leslie Ramirez, Contributor

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






Have you ever remembered something in a specific way throughout your whole life and it ends up being all wrong? You, just like many others, have experienced the Mandela Effect. The Mandela Effect is a phenomenon in which a large group of the population remembers something or someone that never actually existed

The Mandela Effect began when a researcher named Fiona Broome coined the term after realizing her and many others in a conference room shared a similar memory. They all recalled Nelson Mandela, a South African President, dying while imprisoned some time in the 1980s when he really died in the year of 2010.  They even remember seeing the news on his death and citizens rioting in South Africa. That’s when Fiona Broome created the website, TheMandelaEffect.com, to show there are more examples of this occurrence and that they aren’t just delusional.

 There’s many theories that try to explain why this happens, the most popular one is time travel. In 1905, Albert Einstein and his colleague, Hermann Minkowski, showed how time traveling could be possible. His theory is called Special Relativity. The theory says that time and space are aspects of the same thing, space-time. In space-time, time goes slower for you than others, but you won’t notice until you have returned. So really, time is relative to how fast you are moving. They said how there’s people who time travel and others who don’t even know they do it.  These people are the ones that are often seen as too young for their age or the opposite, too old. Today, scientist say astronauts are somewhat time travelers themselves, because they move faster in space than the rest of us on Earth.

 

People have come up with other explanations for this phenomenon, such as Occam’s Razor and Confabulation. William of Occam created this principle saying one should not make more assumptions than the minimum needed. This relates to us because even if we see something everyday, our brain is still likely to change our memory a little. Confabulation is when a person fills in gaps of a memory they don’t entirely remember. One thing that people have most trouble storing in their brains is spelling. This would explain why people misinterpret a book title or movie. Many more theories are being made to explain The Mandela Effect.  I mean, why else would millions of Americans remember the iconic line from Snow White, “Mirror, mirror, on the wall,” when in reality she never said that? She really said, “Magic mirror on the wall.” Time travel is just many of the theories people have come up with. If you still don’t believe in this, here’s three pictures that are somewhat similar. Choose the one that you think is correct without guessing and maybe you’ll surprise yourself and end up being a victim of the Mandela Effect yourself.

After looking through these pictures you probably thought you nailed it right? Coca Cola does have the dot in between, Forrest Gump really said life was like a box of chocolates, not “is”, and last but not least, Tony The Tiger never had a black nose, it was always blue. The correct choices were 2, 2, and 1 in order. There’s much more evidence of the Mandela Effect that proves people aren’t just going crazy.  Why else would our brain trick us into thinking something in a particular way when in reality we were wrong the whole time? It’s not coincidental that a lot of people remember these things incorrectly.

Leave a Comment

If you want a picture to show with your comment, go get a gravatar.




Navigate Left
  • The Mandela Effect

    Arts and Entertainment

    The Cycle of Breaking Apart and Building It Back Together

  • The Mandela Effect

    Arts and Entertainment

    Big Mouth Review

  • The Mandela Effect

    Arts and Entertainment

    Anything Goes: A Student Review of the Spring Musical

  • The Mandela Effect

    Arts and Entertainment

    “The Martian” Book Review

  • The Mandela Effect

    Arts and Entertainment

    What Fugazi’s “Turnover” has to do with the Clifton Student Union, and why you should care

  • The Mandela Effect

    Social Media Trends

    An Egg Became the Most Liked Picture on Instagram

  • The Mandela Effect

    Arts and Entertainment

    Are You the Same Person on Social Media as You Are in Real Life?

  • The Mandela Effect

    Arts and Entertainment

    “The Other Wes Moore” Book Review

  • The Mandela Effect

    Arts and Entertainment

    “Mary Poppins Returns” Movie Review

  • Arts and Entertainment

    Misty Copeland

Navigate Right
The Student News Site of Clifton High School
The Mandela Effect